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2019 𝘿𝙪𝙘𝙠𝙨 𝙐𝙣𝙡𝙞𝙢𝙞𝙩𝙚𝙙 𝙋𝙪𝙢𝙥𝙠𝙞𝙣 𝘾𝙖𝙧𝙫𝙞𝙣𝙜 𝘾𝙤𝙣𝙩𝙚𝙨𝙩 
The 2019 Ducks Unlimited Pumpkin Carving Contest begins TODAY. Win great prizes for carving your best Ducks Unlimited, waterfowl or waterfowl hunting inspired pumpkins! 
𝙃𝙤𝙬 𝙩𝙤 𝙀𝙣𝙩𝙚𝙧:
1. Carve your best Ducks Unlimited, waterfowl, or waterfowl hunting inspired pumpkin and take a picture. (Get the best picture possible!) 2. Upload your photo to Instagram and use the hashtag #DUPumpkin2019 by October 28, 2019 at 11:59 p.m. (If account is set to private, please DM us with the photo and the hashtag.) Ducks Unlimited staff will select 4 finalists. Voting will take place on the Ducks Unlimited Instagram page on October 29 - October 30, 2019. The Grand Prize Winner will be posted on the Ducks Unlimited Instagram page by 2 p.m. on October 31, 2019.

𝙂𝙧𝙖𝙣𝙙 𝙋𝙧𝙞𝙯𝙚 𝙋𝙖𝙘𝙠𝙖𝙜𝙚:
A YETI Tundra 45 full of Official Ducks Unlimited swag
𝙏𝙝𝙧𝙚𝙚 𝙃𝙤𝙣𝙤𝙧𝙖𝙗𝙡𝙚 𝙈𝙚𝙣𝙩𝙞𝙤𝙣𝙨
Tons of Ducks Unlimited swag
| **There is no purchase necessary to enter this contest. You must be 18 or older to win and a resident of the United States. ** Ducks Unlimited has the rights to use images submitted to this contest in any manner. ** This contest is in no way sponsored, endorsed or administered by, or associated with, Instagram. |
#DucksUnlimited #DUPumpkin2019 #wetlands #waterfowl #conservation #pumpkins #pumpkincarving #contest
2019 𝘿𝙪𝙘𝙠𝙨 𝙐𝙣𝙡𝙞𝙢𝙞𝙩𝙚𝙙 𝙋𝙪𝙢𝙥𝙠𝙞𝙣 𝘾𝙖𝙧𝙫𝙞𝙣𝙜 𝘾𝙤𝙣𝙩𝙚𝙨𝙩 The 2019 Ducks Unlimited Pumpkin Carving Contest begins TODAY. Win great prizes for carving your best Ducks Unlimited, waterfowl or waterfowl hunting inspired pumpkins! 𝙃𝙤𝙬 𝙩𝙤 𝙀𝙣𝙩𝙚𝙧: 1. Carve your best Ducks Unlimited, waterfowl, or waterfowl hunting inspired pumpkin and take a picture. (Get the best picture possible!) 2. Upload your photo to Instagram and use the hashtag #DUPumpkin2019 by October 28, 2019 at 11:59 p.m. (If account is set to private, please DM us with the photo and the hashtag.) Ducks Unlimited staff will select 4 finalists. Voting will take place on the Ducks Unlimited Instagram page on October 29 - October 30, 2019. The Grand Prize Winner will be posted on the Ducks Unlimited Instagram page by 2 p.m. on October 31, 2019. 𝙂𝙧𝙖𝙣𝙙 𝙋𝙧𝙞𝙯𝙚 𝙋𝙖𝙘𝙠𝙖𝙜𝙚: A YETI Tundra 45 full of Official Ducks Unlimited swag 𝙏𝙝𝙧𝙚𝙚 𝙃𝙤𝙣𝙤𝙧𝙖𝙗𝙡𝙚 𝙈𝙚𝙣𝙩𝙞𝙤𝙣𝙨 Tons of Ducks Unlimited swag | **There is no purchase necessary to enter this contest. You must be 18 or older to win and a resident of the United States. ** Ducks Unlimited has the rights to use images submitted to this contest in any manner. ** This contest is in no way sponsored, endorsed or administered by, or associated with, Instagram. | #DucksUnlimited #DUPumpkin2019 #wetlands #waterfowl #conservation #pumpkins #pumpkincarving #contest
My buddy Todd Gifford and I piled up mallards and geese this morning while hunting over a small pond just south of St. Paul, Minnesota. We watched migrating greenheads in flocks of six to 30 circle and circle before finally committing to our spread—or flaring at the last second just out of shotgun range. We could have both shot limits, but we each stopped one bird short (kind of our good luck tradition) and wrapped up our little hunt by 8:30 a.m. It was a morning to remember, and it was right in Gifford's backyard. In a lot of ways, we’re living in the glory days of duck hunting right now. I think this is largely thanks to conservation dollars from hunting and a strong National Wildlife Refuge System. #NationalWildlifeRefugeWeek

According to @usfws surveys, the breeding mallard population is up 2 percent from last year and up 19 percent from it’s long-term average (since 1955) at an estimated 9.4 million. These mallards use the 567 National Wildlife Refuges and 38 Wetland Management Districts covering 95 million acres to breed and migrate each year. I'm pretty proud that our duck stamp dollars are the lifeblood of this system. For every dollar we spend on our federal Stamps, 98 cents goes directly to purchase vital habitat or acquire conservation easements for protection in the National Wildlife Refuge System. Since 1934, 6 million acres have been acquired using Federal Duck Stamp revenues. @alexrobinson_mn

#greenheads #duckhunting #duckseason #hunting #nationalwildliferefuge
My buddy Todd Gifford and I piled up mallards and geese this morning while hunting over a small pond just south of St. Paul, Minnesota. We watched migrating greenheads in flocks of six to 30 circle and circle before finally committing to our spread—or flaring at the last second just out of shotgun range. We could have both shot limits, but we each stopped one bird short (kind of our good luck tradition) and wrapped up our little hunt by 8:30 a.m. It was a morning to remember, and it was right in Gifford's backyard. In a lot of ways, we’re living in the glory days of duck hunting right now. I think this is largely thanks to conservation dollars from hunting and a strong National Wildlife Refuge System. #NationalWildlifeRefugeWeek According to @usfws surveys, the breeding mallard population is up 2 percent from last year and up 19 percent from it’s long-term average (since 1955) at an estimated 9.4 million. These mallards use the 567 National Wildlife Refuges and 38 Wetland Management Districts covering 95 million acres to breed and migrate each year. I'm pretty proud that our duck stamp dollars are the lifeblood of this system. For every dollar we spend on our federal Stamps, 98 cents goes directly to purchase vital habitat or acquire conservation easements for protection in the National Wildlife Refuge System. Since 1934, 6 million acres have been acquired using Federal Duck Stamp revenues. @alexrobinson_mn #greenheads #duckhunting #duckseason #hunting #nationalwildliferefuge
@ramseyrussellgetducks has learned some straightforward lessons during his world travels: Don’t drink the milk in Pakistan, and keep your firearms documentation on your person when you go through customs in China. But the biggest takeaway cuts deeper, to the culture of American waterfowl hunting. Generally, we kill fewer ducks per hunt than you can almost anywhere else in the world, and yet we’re the ones obsessed with numbers.

That’s because the strict limits on how many ducks and how many of each species we can kill forces American waterfowlers to be careful counters. Each dead bird is one notch closer to a limit. A full limit means the end of the hunt, and complete success.

As Russell says: “It’s almost like if you only shoot three ducks, you lost. It’s made to feel like if you’re not killing a limit, you’re not having fun.” Of course, these limits are good and necessary for conservation. In the U.S., we have much higher hunter-density numbers than in other parts of the world. There are about 1 million U.S. waterfowlers. In comparison, only a few hundred Americans travel to the Yaqi Valley in Mexico to hunt ducks each winter, according to Russell. Those few hundred hunters end up harvesting a statistically insignificant number of ducks, even if they’re bringing back a whole pile of birds each day.

In the rest of the world, waterfowl hunting for sport isn’t as common, and neither are limits or hunting pressure. In some corners of the world, you set your own limit. One of Russell’s hunts in Pakistan drives home the point.

He was invited by a feudal lord to hunt a sprawling marsh along the Indus River (one of the longest rivers in Asia, which serves as a major flyway). The lord had heard that the American was a crack shot, so he made his way down to the blind to watch. He gave Russell a few boxes of shells from his personal stash—German-made, 3-inch lead loads—and insisted that Russell take long shots that most American hunters would consider sky blasting. “If you want to hunt in Pakistan, you must shoot like a Pakistani,” the lord said.
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Hit the link in bio to keep reading @alexrobinson_mn ’s profile of @ramseyrussellgetducks 📷:@jfeltovic311 #getducks
@ramseyrussellgetducks has learned some straightforward lessons during his world travels: Don’t drink the milk in Pakistan, and keep your firearms documentation on your person when you go through customs in China. But the biggest takeaway cuts deeper, to the culture of American waterfowl hunting. Generally, we kill fewer ducks per hunt than you can almost anywhere else in the world, and yet we’re the ones obsessed with numbers. That’s because the strict limits on how many ducks and how many of each species we can kill forces American waterfowlers to be careful counters. Each dead bird is one notch closer to a limit. A full limit means the end of the hunt, and complete success. As Russell says: “It’s almost like if you only shoot three ducks, you lost. It’s made to feel like if you’re not killing a limit, you’re not having fun.” Of course, these limits are good and necessary for conservation. In the U.S., we have much higher hunter-density numbers than in other parts of the world. There are about 1 million U.S. waterfowlers. In comparison, only a few hundred Americans travel to the Yaqi Valley in Mexico to hunt ducks each winter, according to Russell. Those few hundred hunters end up harvesting a statistically insignificant number of ducks, even if they’re bringing back a whole pile of birds each day. In the rest of the world, waterfowl hunting for sport isn’t as common, and neither are limits or hunting pressure. In some corners of the world, you set your own limit. One of Russell’s hunts in Pakistan drives home the point. He was invited by a feudal lord to hunt a sprawling marsh along the Indus River (one of the longest rivers in Asia, which serves as a major flyway). The lord had heard that the American was a crack shot, so he made his way down to the blind to watch. He gave Russell a few boxes of shells from his personal stash—German-made, 3-inch lead loads—and insisted that Russell take long shots that most American hunters would consider sky blasting. “If you want to hunt in Pakistan, you must shoot like a Pakistani,” the lord said. - Hit the link in bio to keep reading @alexrobinson_mn ’s profile of @ramseyrussellgetducks 📷:@jfeltovic311 #getducks
“Most of us save the concept of ‘bucket-list trips’ for the twilight of our hunting career. We’re only willing to roll the dice once we acknowledge that time is running out. But Ramsey Russell faced his own mortality when he was a kid. During a long, torturous recovery, the teenager forged a saying that became his personal creed and would later become his business slogan: ‘Life is short, get ducks.’ Eventually, Russell earned a forestry degree and landed a job with the federal government. When he worked up enough scratch, he started traveling to hunt waterfowl in Canada and Argentina. He made his first international trip to Saskatchewan in 1998.

Russell has the ideal temperament to captain a crew of duck hunters. He's intense enough to make sure everyone brings their A-game (‘Turn off the damn phone and play for keeps’), but he's also experienced enough to know that the whole point of the thing is to have a good time—and he's unabashed about his love for shooting ducks (‘Hell yeah, shooting ducks is fun, and hell yeah, it's conservation’). So, Russell had no problem recruiting buddies to go with him abroad. He started bringing so many other hunters along that an outfitter convinced him to open a part-time booking-­agency business.
“Most of us save the concept of ‘bucket-list trips’ for the twilight of our hunting career. We’re only willing to roll the dice once we acknowledge that time is running out. But Ramsey Russell faced his own mortality when he was a kid. During a long, torturous recovery, the teenager forged a saying that became his personal creed and would later become his business slogan: ‘Life is short, get ducks.’ Eventually, Russell earned a forestry degree and landed a job with the federal government. When he worked up enough scratch, he started traveling to hunt waterfowl in Canada and Argentina. He made his first international trip to Saskatchewan in 1998. Russell has the ideal temperament to captain a crew of duck hunters. He's intense enough to make sure everyone brings their A-game (‘Turn off the damn phone and play for keeps’), but he's also experienced enough to know that the whole point of the thing is to have a good time—and he's unabashed about his love for shooting ducks (‘Hell yeah, shooting ducks is fun, and hell yeah, it's conservation’). So, Russell had no problem recruiting buddies to go with him abroad. He started bringing so many other hunters along that an outfitter convinced him to open a part-time booking-­agency business." - Hit the link in our bio to keep reading @alexrobinson_mn ’s profile of @ramseyrussellgetducks Photographs of this pink-eared duck and Russell (second image, left) hunting flooded timber Down Under by @jake_latendresse #getducks #lifesshortgetducks #itsduckseasonsomewhere #outdoorlifemagazine #hunting #duckhunting #waterfowl #waterfowlhunting