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โ€œOne of the most special moments of a hunt to me is the short time after pulling the trigger and before packing out an animal. Sometimes itโ€™s on an evening hunt for bears, a morning of flushing grouse, or maybe it comes after a week of chasing rams around in mountain crags.

In every case, that moment after I take an animal is special to me, and I often take photos. Sometimes Iโ€™ll take photos of just the animal, but more often itโ€™s me smiling in the picture with the animal. Not only am I happy to have been successful in the hunt, but Iโ€™m also getting to admire the critter up closeโ€”looking at a ram or grizzly bear in his entirety, knowing that in half an hour heโ€™s going to be boned out in a Kifaru backpack.

The caping and quartering is a necessary next step of the process, but I want to remember the animal whole, too. So I take pictures, immortalizing the moment. Iโ€™d be willing to venture a wild guess that the vast majority of hunters who take photos with the animals they kill do so primarily to keep the memories of that very special moment crisp and alive for years to come, much in the same way taxidermy mounts do. Iโ€™m sure there are a few who only do it to impress others, but if thatโ€™s your reason for hunting, youโ€™re not getting the full experience.

Why bring this up you might ask? Well, for one, itโ€™s deer season in the lower 48 right now and hundreds of thousands of grip-and-grin photos are being taken, texted back and forth, and posted on the Internet. Believe it or not, there is what some might consider a movement to stop taking โ€œgrip-n-grins,โ€ or trophy photos altogether, voiced by a few digital influencers in positions with a lot of exposure. Now, each person should follow their own ethical convictions. Love taking grip-n-grin photos? Great. Donโ€™t want to take them? Thatโ€™s great, too.

But itโ€™s worth tracking recent trends in hunting photo etiquette to get an understanding of how people are thinking about what it means to kill an animal, and how they are portraying that to the world. So letโ€™s take a look at how we got here.โ€ | Hit the link in profile to keep reading @thetylerfreelโ€™s piece. #gripandgrin #hunting #deerhunting
โ€œOne of the most special moments of a hunt to me is the short time after pulling the trigger and before packing out an animal. Sometimes itโ€™s on an evening hunt for bears, a morning of flushing grouse, or maybe it comes after a week of chasing rams around in mountain crags. In every case, that moment after I take an animal is special to me, and I often take photos. Sometimes Iโ€™ll take photos of just the animal, but more often itโ€™s me smiling in the picture with the animal. Not only am I happy to have been successful in the hunt, but Iโ€™m also getting to admire the critter up closeโ€”looking at a ram or grizzly bear in his entirety, knowing that in half an hour heโ€™s going to be boned out in a Kifaru backpack. The caping and quartering is a necessary next step of the process, but I want to remember the animal whole, too. So I take pictures, immortalizing the moment. Iโ€™d be willing to venture a wild guess that the vast majority of hunters who take photos with the animals they kill do so primarily to keep the memories of that very special moment crisp and alive for years to come, much in the same way taxidermy mounts do. Iโ€™m sure there are a few who only do it to impress others, but if thatโ€™s your reason for hunting, youโ€™re not getting the full experience. Why bring this up you might ask? Well, for one, itโ€™s deer season in the lower 48 right now and hundreds of thousands of grip-and-grin photos are being taken, texted back and forth, and posted on the Internet. Believe it or not, there is what some might consider a movement to stop taking โ€œgrip-n-grins,โ€ or trophy photos altogether, voiced by a few digital influencers in positions with a lot of exposure. Now, each person should follow their own ethical convictions. Love taking grip-n-grin photos? Great. Donโ€™t want to take them? Thatโ€™s great, too. But itโ€™s worth tracking recent trends in hunting photo etiquette to get an understanding of how people are thinking about what it means to kill an animal, and how they are portraying that to the world. So letโ€™s take a look at how we got here.โ€ | Hit the link in profile to keep reading @thetylerfreelโ€™s piece. #gripandgrin #hunting #deerhunting